Chapter 20: Remember That No One Ever Kicks A Dead Dog: Dale Carnegie’s How To Stop Worrying And Start Living Book Chapter Summary.

Important! Dogs get kicked. Dead dogs don’t. That is how Dale Carnegie explains criticism at the start of Part 6, Chapter 20 of, “How To Stop Worrying And Start Living.”

Dale tells us that people have this thing about wanting to pick other people apart who are in successful or high positions. They get satisfaction out of criticizing the more successful person, or person in a higher position, because it makes them feel more important.

Of course, there are people out there who will criticize anyone because they can, or because they don’t feel good about themselves in the first place. They don’t care what position someone holds in life and will stop at nothing to throw in a few cheap shots whenever they get the chance.

Insecurity is a driving factor when it comes to this kind of behavior. That and dissatisfaction with one’s own life.

What people don’t realize though is that, by attacking us and criticizing our perceived faults, they are actually letting us know that we are important. They don’t understand that by running off at the mouth about every negative thing they think we are, “They are complimenting us!” The more they do it and the longer they go on about it shows us just how important we are in the scheme of things.

It matters not what they say about us. The harder folks have to work to find fault with us the more they let us know just how much they feel inferior to us. If they were superior to us they wouldn’t pay us any mind at all.

So, the way Dale writes it, if people are criticizing us we can take it as a positive sign that we really are special and important. We are doing well. Our achievements are being noticed.

“So!” If we look at it from the perspective that Mr. Carnegie gives us on the matter; it certainly does seem that it would be more fun to smile at those who are criticizing us, rather than giving them the satisfaction of knowing that they are getting to us. That’s a pretty cool way of looking at being criticized isn’t it?

Author: Brian Schnabel

[Email: brian@brianschnabel.com]: Seeking my very own Joan Watson in Elementary 26-year-old form; I’m plugin it all in here via Microsoft Word 2016, Windows 10, JAWS 18.0.2945 and the screen reader accessibility of WordPress 4.8.0.

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