Chapter 6: How To Crowd Worry Out Of Your Mind: Dale Carnegie’s How To Stop Worrying And Start Living Book Chapter Summary.

In writing the Summarization of Part 3 Chapter 6 of Dale Carnegie’s Book, How To Stop Worrying And Start Living; I’ve just got to ask, “Are you really stressing over a situation unfolding around you that you have no control of and no place in even thinking about trying to take control of it?” No? Well, maybe you are just really sad because you lost a loved one whom you were really close to and now find yourself dragging along every day, feeling terrible since the loss occurred? That doesn’t describe you either, ha? Awesome!

We don’t wish those things on anyone. But they can happen to any normal living breathing human being and the upset that accompanies events in life like these is perfectly normal. If it happens to you and you find yourself feeling down/worried about it just know that there really is a cure in the house to help take away the pain when you are ready to let it go!

What is this magic cure? It’s really a remarkable one that doesn’t even require a trip to the drugstore for antidepressants! It’s called, “Get Busy!” Yup! That really is the cure Dale Carnegie has heard, from a lot of people, which really seems to work best!

Why does it work? Well, as Dale explains in his book, keeping busy helps us to take our minds off of the negatives in life. This is because it’s impossible to have two thoughts at exactly the same time. If you’ve got doubts about that then feel free to check with the psychologist of your choosing. I’d be willing to bet that they can verify this fact for you like no one else can. In fact I think they would call what you are describing something like, “Occupational Therapy!”

The same principle holds true for emotions. One will find that being dragged down by grief is not within their realm of capability while they are feeling a rush of joy and excitement about something else they are doing. One emotion will always drive the other out, hands down. God has built us in such a manner that we, as in the case of our thoughts, will simply not be able to have two feelings at the same time, either.

Carnegie explains that worry is a part of every human beings basic psychological composition. It proved very effective in helping man to survive long before the days of civilization. Worry is a part of the mechanism of the mind that helped us as a race to survive during our caveman phase known as Fight or Flight. Worry is still a major component of that natural mechanism; a mechanism that can have a very powerful hold over us if we allow it to, even today.

Mr. Carnegie explains that if the mind is left idle for too long of a time our imaginations can really start to run away from us. The imagination can start to conjure up things that are sort of true at first if left unchecked. But if allowed to continue that imagination will eventually convince us that things exist as a part of the situation upsetting us, even though these things aren’t present in reality.

Dale tells us this is natural but not unpreventable. The solution for controlling this is pretty straight forward though!

Find a positive activity that we enjoy so much it drives out worry. Then worry will eventually give up on calling upon us and go away.

According to what is in the text of, “How to Stop Worrying and Start Living,” if we are still experiencing worry while doing positive activities in our daily lives then we need to increase the number of activities. For many people this works well alone. But keeping as busy as possible also works well when practiced in conjunction with therapy or counseling.

Bottom line? Got Worry? Great! What are you going to do about it? Get busy perhaps? Yes? Rocken!

Author: Brian Schnabel

[Email: brian@brianschnabel.com]: Seeking my very own Joan Watson in Elementary 26-year-old form; I’m plugin it all in here via Microsoft Word 2016, Windows 10, JAWS 18.0.2945 and the screen reader accessibility of WordPress 4.8.0.

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